Kew Gardens | History & Facts

Kew Gardens, originally Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, a botanical garden situated in Kew the home to an estate of the royal family

Kew Gardens | History & Facts

Kew Gardens, originally Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, a botanical garden situated in Kew the home to an estate of the royal family situated in the London city of Richmond upon Thames. In 2003, Kew Gardens has designated a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Private gardens were maintained at Kew beginning in around the year 16thcentury. The property was purchased by the Capel family in 1731 by Frederick Louis, prince of Wales, and later by Augusta Dowager Princess of Wales who established the garden to grow exotic plants in 1759. It was home to more than 3,400 plants. Kew Gardens became famous under the direction (1772-1819) of Sir Joseph Banks, and the collections expanded to include plants from all over the globe. Under the guidance (1841-65) of Sir William Jackson Hooker and his son Joseph Dalton Hooker (1865-85), Kew Gardens became a place for scientific research as well as the exchange of international plants. The gardens were handed over to the nation and in the 20th century, the grounds had been increased to the current dimensions of 300 acres (120 acres). Kew established the plantation business of rubber. It continues to play an important part in plant introduction as well as for quarantine purposes. ( Check out BTW: Brasillianis Hevea and the increase and rise Asian plantation and rise of Asian plantations.)

Kew Gardens contains some 28,680 taxa of living plants, a herbarium with around seven million dried plants, as well as the Kew Gardens library contains around 130,000 volumes, in addition to archived collections including periodicals, prints, and drawings. The collection of tropical orchids, tropical ferns as well as Australian plants is exquisitely fine. Since 1965, Kew has managed a botanical outstation in Wakehurst Place, West Sussex, 1974, in 1974, the Kew Seed Bank was established there. In 1996, the seed bank initiative expanded to include an initiative known as the Millennium Seed Bank Project (later the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership) to help prevent the loss of valuable and threatened plants by preserving seeds. Kew's Millennium Seed Bank is the largest seed bank for wild plants anywhere in the world. In 2018, it held around 13 % of wild plant species in the world with 2.25 million seeds from 189 nations. The goal of the organization is to save 25 % of all most bankable species of plants in the year 2020.

Sir William Chambers designed the Orangery (1761) which is a stunning illustration of Georgian architecture The Great Pagoda (1762), the 163-foot (49.7-metre-) tall tower in the Chinese style; as well as a number of lesser landmarks and monuments. The latest projects include the Princess of Wales Conservatory (1987) and The Sir Joseph Banks Centre for Economic Botany (1990), and a visitors ' center (1992). The first Japanese garden was established in Kew in the year 1996. In the year 2018, the Temperate House the largest Victorian glasshouse was opened again following a $57 million overhaul. One of the publications produced by Kew includes Kew Bulletin, which is one of the publications. Kew Bulletin (issued every quarter). It is the Index Kewensis, which is edited by Kew and maintains a list of all the higher plant species in the world since the period of Linnaeus.

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